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Career Personal

So long and thanks for the application.

I got an email yesterday, I know, amazing I got an email! This content of the email was as follows – with some details redacted to protect the innocent. If you’re not interested in a quasi-rant, just stop reading now…

Dear Mark Mace:

Thank you for your application for the [redacted] position in the department of [redacted], job
opening ID [redacted]. This position was posted 09/25/2014 through 10/25/2014. The department has completed
their activity on this position, and it has been filled/closed.

You are encouraged to continue your career search by using the University’s
automated employment system at http://[redacted].

Sincerely,

The University of [redacted]

Please do not reply to this automated email.

Getting this kind of email isn’t all that unusual, especially if you are actively seeking employment. What does bother me about this is particular email is the length of time between the “closing” date and the notification of the position being filled/closed. It is obvious to me that this is just HR cleaning up records, but at this point, why even send the email? Which brings up the second annoyance in general, with most applications being a semi-automated process, exactly how difficult is it to crank out the “thank you but no thanks” letter once the position is filled? This organization managed to send one out 1 year and 2 months after the fact. With a little bit of work, I bet they could get it down to 6 months! And, while I’m at it, way to inform me of what happened!  I have no idea if a better candidate got the position, if no one was interviewed because that position didn’t get funded, if the department was disbanded.  So many options, but no real answers.

On a positive note, I have had some excellent communications between applicant and potential employer.  Those simple emails that appear to be personal, but could still be mass produced, to just let me know what’s going on.  Those emails give potential employers a higher rating in my book.  Those type of emails make me think “I want to work for this organization”.  It’s a personal touch that make the applicant feel as if you care about them.  It’s something that is missing, something that used to be common.  Maybe it’s because the quantity of applicants are just staggering now, but with the automated application processes, those type of emails should be even easier to automate.

Well, that’s my rant, just one of those things that stuck with me the last couple of days and I thought I would share.

By Mark

I work in IT and ride Motorcycles. I do one to support the other.